ProStudioUSA

Providing photography equipment and expertise to amateur and professional photographers alike

How Photographers Can Avoid Upsetting the Bride

We scoured the internet looking at what brides dislike most about their wedding photography experience. Surprisingly it came down two issues, neither being the actual photographs. These are communications and presentation.

     Here is what a bride and groom expect from you.

    1. Deliver on time. Brides do not want to keep hearing you are busy, another week is needed, or any of those types of delays. Give the bride a date and stick to it.

    2. Direct the couple during the photography. You are the expert and should have the ideas. Offering direction begins in the pre-wedding discussions.

    3. Recognize the customer is always right. You should listen to the type of pictures the bride wants and stick to the shot list. The shot list should be agreed to in the pre-wedding discussions.

    4. Shoot in the style the bride wants. If you can’t or won’t shoot in the style she wants, be upfront with her at the get-go. Suggest other photographers who may please her more. You may not gain a client, but your colleagues will appreciate the referral and your reputation will stay intact.

    5. Make the presentation special. Photo presentation is as much as part of the event as the ceremony itself. Keep her feeling special by going the extra mile to present her wedding as a gift to her.

    6. No cheap CDs or jump drives. Cheap presentation makes your photography look less desirable. Photography is a big investment. Use a suitable-sized, well-constructed and elegant portfolio box that presents your work with pride. You can add branding these boxes for additional exposure. If you’re going to use a CD or jump drive, then use a CD/DVD presentation album or consider this style of the jump drive.

    7. Don’t half present your product. If you only have final photos but the prints and books aren’t ready, then wait for the books and prints.

Our advice is to go out of your way and make the photography experience as special as the rest of the wedding. You are providing the memories the couple will cherish.

Who Prints Your Personal Pictures?

­­­Who is printing your client’s pictures? The quality of your final prints can be a factor in how that photo will be handled. If you’re a professional photographer using Walgreen’s, Costco or even Sam’s club you are undermining your value! If you have pictures that are simple snapshots it might be ok. But quality photography deserves quality printing.

If you do not follow that practice it will be difficult to sell that concept to your clients. A print made from a pro lab will be better than those from a consumer retailer! They’re usually protected by a portfolio cover or stored more carefully in a portfolio box. If a lower cost print is damaged, they may be easier to replace, but a higher-quality print will be treated much better and cherished longer.

A higher quality print offers better credibility. People are more willing to invest more in them. Your eyes, your technical skills and your personal attention to details all add to your professionalism. People are more willing to pay more for quality.

As a professional, you can explain the importance of you’re using quality photo labs do result in better prints. If you are going to invest in a photo shoot, also invest in quality prints to honor the session. Your clients are worth the extra cost of high quality prints.

When they order prints, remember the importance of presenting them in a quality manner. A simple envelope may not cut it. Provide them with a personalized logo imprinted on a quality photo folder in a personalized photo box and they will generate referrals and more business. Professionals understand the importance of delivering their work in quality packaging. Pro Studio features a variety of photo packaging to choose from.

Color calibration doesn’t end before the print process. A good understanding of paper profiles used to match a printer model does produce higher color quality. Better quality papers inherently produce higher archival properties. Better papers are heavier and can stand up to more handling with out sudden bends and folds unlike cheaper papers. Finally, once mounted and framed, can and should last hundreds of years without deterioration.

A combination photo shoot.

A few weeks ago I covered a local event called the BrewTown Rumble. It was part portrait session for the Pin-up models of a pageant and part location candids. These lovely ladies wanted great professional portraits which required a studio set-up and my Nikon DSLR. For the location candids, I tend to use my iPhone6. If you know your equipment and lighting this combination works incredibly well.

In regards to the portrait session, it’s important to be in control of your lighting.  I use Wescxott TD5 Florescent lighting with softboxes. I prefer the constant light rather than strobes due to my not doing portrait work full time. The constant lighting allows me to see where my shadows fall and how the light effects my models faces before taking the picture. Strobe lighting is a skill all photographers should know how to use especially full-time photographers.

My florescent lamps are ‘’daylight’’ rated and I can mix the natural sunlight into my studio session. Depending on the specific situation, it can add to the portrait. It’s another benefit of using daylight florescent lamps.

Once I started covering the days event, I like using my iPhone. It becomes my simple ‘’point-n-shoot’’ camera so I can concentrate strictly on composition. I own and use a Moment telephoto lens plus the standard iPhone lens. I quickly and easily switch between the two as needed. Using the iPhone allows me to be less intrusive. Photos are also easier to take as people are less intimidated now by cell phones. Cell phones allow you to be far more reactive at events. The lower you can get to the ground with your iPhone the more impact your photos will have.

Have more questions about iPhone photography? Send me an email and lets talk about it and checkout my iPhone site at www.iphoneographyart.com

Instagram and the Best Practices for Photographers

Instagram has become a dominate social media outlet for artists and photographers. 21% of adults are using it with 53% between the ages of 18-29. That puts your prospects right in the age range of needing a professional photographer. That makes Instagram an important means to spread word message.

If you do a Google search on protecting your images on Instagram you’ll find 17,700,000 results. I weeded through many sites to gather some useful information to help you stop the likes of Richard Prince from using your photos for their gain. Unfortunately, It is possible to have others to profit from your hard work. There are several steps you can take to protect yourself and your images.

Every client must sign a release allowing the use of their photos on Instagram and other social media outlets. Many releases may not include the details of social media so a section that addresses it must be updated. This could protect you from unintentional uses of your photo.

Never upload a full resolution files. Several of the social media outlets downgrade the image quality intentionally at uploading. Many of todays DSLR’s are so sharp you may have to downsize them yourself.

You can also add a variety watermarks to every image before uploading to any site. Watermarks can go from a detailed logo to a simple name faded over an image. Some may be annoyed by this practice so you need to decide how and where you want to use it on your images. Often the lower right corner or upper left hand corner are the most common and the the way most people view images. An other simple method is to upload only a part of an image without removing any crucial part of the picture.  

There is quite a bit of info on this topic. “Stop stealing my sh*t!” covers the highly technical ways you can protect yourself on Instagram and other social media outlets. Go to this link for a worthwhile article by www.skinnyartist.com for some great details.